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Is It Worth Getting a Dispraxia Diagnosis

Dyspraxia is a lifelong condition and there is no cure. Often people will say is it worth getting a diagnosis if it can’t be cured. When I asked my sons OT for a referal to a paediatrician to diagnose his dyspraxia, she said ‘ they often wont see children for DCD (Dyspraxia) because they dont think there is any point because they cant treat it.” In my opinion it is worth getting a diagnosis for a number of reasons.

If you have a formal diagnosis then allowances have to be made at school and in further education. Students can get extra time in exams and extra tutoring. Teachers are more likely to explain things slower and give them individual attention. Without a diagnosis the child will often  get  no understanding . My son had to wait a long time for a diagnosis because I couldn’t afford a private pediatrician, OT, or physiotherapist. I explained to his teachers that I suspected he had dyspraxia.  He needed things explained more slowly and  he didn’t loose and forget things on purpose. I was constantly told he was lazy and wasn’t trying. To be fair however , his year 5 teacher was great. He was very supportive of him getting a diagnosis even when he was no longer his teacher. He also knew what dyspraxia was and didn’t look at me like I was talking another language. The rest of them were useless and continued to say he wasnt trying until they were given the piece of paper confirming I was right

There is also assistance with looking for employment. A disability job network will give you more support and understanding then a normal job network. They wont make you apply for jobs that you wont be able to do. If you get a job your support worker will also advocate for you with an employer. I had to attend a general job network before I was referred to the disability support network. If you are unable to do a certain job. they accuse you of not wanting to work and threaten to have your benefits cut if you don’t do it. Even when I told them I was in the process of being referred to a disability network, I was accused of lying. The government will also pay a subsidy to employers for employing someone with a disability.

For me the final reason is the most important. I was 13 before I was diagnosed . I grew up feeling stupid because I wasnt like the other kids. When I was diagnosed, it wasnt really explained to me. I knew it was why I was clumsy and tripped over. But there is more to dyspraxia than that. About 5 years ago I went to TAFE to train as an Education Assistant. We were asked to do an assignment on a special need and my lecturer suggested I should do dyspraxia. I borrowed several books from the library and it was like an epiphany. Suddenly there was a reason I was disorganised, talked to loud and couldn’t read a map.

Knowing the reason I can’t estimate distances or remember more than 2 instructions at once is because I have dyspraxia doesn’t make me any better at these things. It does however make me feel better about it. It isn’t because I am less competent than other people . My brain is just wired differently so I find some things more difficult. It also helps to know that I am not the only one. There are other people who struggle with the same things I do. I still loose things, talk to loud and write directions down. But I struggle for a reason and there are other people struggling too

Sharon Beaumont

I am a single mother of 4 who has lived with dyspraxia for several decades. My hope is that by sharing my experiences I can help to raise awareness of dyspraxia. I trained as an Education Assistant but found some areas of this to be a difficult career if you have dyspraxia. Currently I am an Information Technology Student and am trying to teach my self to speak French. I love travel, writing and anything French.

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